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2019 Journal article Open Access OPEN

Understanding the transitions between web interfaces designed to stimulate specific emotions
Donati M., Mori G., Paternò F.
The main goal of this work is to understand how to obtain effective transitions when changing the Web user interfaces from one that stimulates negative affective states to one eliciting more positive emotions. The objective is to improve User eXperience (UX) and usability during the interaction. The transitions applied during the user interface adaptation seek to avoid undesired user disorientation, which can be a consequence of the change. A user study with 40 participants tested three types of transition solutions on a Web application: immediate (changes are applied abruptly all together), overview (changes are first previewed through a small window) and gradual (changes are progressively displayed directly on the interface). The overview and gradual transitions have been designed in such a way as to consider the design criteria used to stimulate specific emotions through the initial and final Web user interfaces. We report and discuss the results of the user test, which, amongst other findings, confirmed that users prefer the overview and gradual transitions.Source: Universal access in the information society (Internet) 19 (2019): 391–407. doi:10.1007/s10209-019-00649-y
DOI: 10.1007/s10209-019-00649-y

See at: ISTI Repository Open Access | Universal Access in the Information Society Restricted | Universal Access in the Information Society Restricted | Universal Access in the Information Society Restricted | Universal Access in the Information Society Restricted | Universal Access in the Information Society Restricted | CNR ExploRA Restricted


2019 Conference article Open Access OPEN

Understanding indoor orientation through wearable vibrotactile feedback
Mori G., Santoro C., Paternò F.
The main goal of this work is to better understand how vibrotactile feedback obtained through wearable actuators can support indoor orientation in unfamiliar buildings. We designed different wearable vibrotactile prototypes (two wristbands, a flexible/rigid glove, one wristband, a cap and two-bands), and we analysed them in a preliminary test with 7 users to identify the design aspects that are most relevant for a solution guiding a person indoor. We describe the design and its evaluation with 36 users, discussing the results that can be useful for developers who want to use this technology within applications that need support for indoor orientation.Source: MUM '19: 18th International Conference on Mobile and Ubiquitous Multimedia, pp. 1–5, Pisa, 27/10/2019, 29/10/2019
DOI: 10.1145/3365610.3368421

See at: ISTI Repository Open Access | ISTI Repository Open Access | academic.microsoft.com Restricted | dblp.uni-trier.de Restricted | dl.acm.org Restricted | dl.acm.org Restricted | CNR ExploRA Restricted


2018 Contribution to conference Open Access OPEN

Towards understanding the usability of vibrotactile support for indoor orientation
Mori G., Paternò F., Santoro C.
This study aims to understand the potential of using vibrotactile stimulation for indoor orientation in complex, unfamiliar buildings. Four vibrotactile prototypes have been analysed and tested in initial trials in order to investigate the benefits and the problems of each solution. The main goal of this study is to reach a better understanding of the design aspects that make a vibrotactile solution intuitive and effective.Source: AVI '18 - International Conference on Advanced Visual Interfaces, Castiglione della Pescaia, Grosseto, Italy, 29 May 2018 - 01 June 2018
DOI: 10.1145/3206505.3206584

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2015 Conference article Open Access OPEN

Design criteria for stimulating emotions in Web applications
Mori G., Paternò F., Furci F.
This work aims to identify the main aspects of Web design responsible for eliciting specific emotions. For this purpose, we performed a user study with 40 participants testing a Web application designed by applying a set of criteria for stimulating various emotions. In particular, we considered six emotions (hate, anxiety, boredom, fun, serenity, love), and for each of them a specific set of design criteria was exploited. The purpose of the study was to reach a better understanding regarding what design techniques are most important to stimulate each emotion. We report on the results obtained and discuss their implications. Such results can inform the development of guidelines for Web applications able to stimulate users' emotions.Source: INTERACT 2015 - Human-Computer Interaction. 15th IFIP TC 13 International Conference, pp. 165–182, Bamberg, Germany, 14-18 September 2015
DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-22701-6_12

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2014 Conference article Open Access OPEN

Design criteria for Web applications adapted to emotions
Mori G., Paternò F., Furci F.
The main goal of this work is to identify a set of design criteria for Web applications taking into account the users' emotions. The results are based on the analysis of a user study with 50 participants who tested six Web interfaces, each one designed to elicit a specific emotion (hate, anxiety, boredom, fun, serenity, love). The design criteria applied to the six emotion-based Web interfaces were drawn from the results of a previous survey, which involved 57 different users, on the relationships between emotional state and Web interfaces. This initial survey asked the users to indicate the emotions most often associated with Web interaction, and then assign each emotion with some specific Web design characteristics. The resulting design criteria can form the basis for a set of emotion-related guidelines for Web application user interfaces.Source: ICWE 2014 - Web Engineering. 14th International Conference, pp. 400–409, Toulouse, France, 1-4 July 2014
DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-08245-5_25

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2014 Conference article Restricted

Collaborative editing: collaboration, awareness and accessibility issues for the blind
Buzzi M. C., Buzzi M., Leporini B., Mori G., Penichet V. M.
Collaborative tools enable teachers and students to easily create and share knowledge as well as edit content in a cooperative way anytime, anywhere, and with various devices. However, technical barriers increase difficulties for users with special needs if interfaces are not designed with accessibility in mind. Blind people in particular may experience great accessibility and usability issues when using collaborative editors via screen reader, with consequent difficulty of inclusion at school or work. In this paper, we discuss the design of usable Web interfaces for collaborative editing, especially focusing on how blind users interact with them. Google Docs was chosen as a case study of a collaborative tool in order to analyze the accessibility of its main collaborative features. Based on the results, five guidelines are proposed for supporting collaborative editing, including "accessible awareness" for blind users.Source: On the Move to Meaningful Internet Systems 2014. Confederated International Workshops: OTM Academy, OTM Industry Case Studies Program, C&TC, EI2N, INBAST, ISDE, META4eS, MSC and OnToContent 2014, pp. 567–573, Amantea, Italy, 27-31/10/2014
DOI: 10.1007/978-3-662-45550-0_58

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2014 Book Unknown

Can blind people learn better? Web accessibility and collaboration to support learning for blind people
Mori, G.
If you think that blind people cannot be able to use educational material for learning something, this book could change your idea. The increasing spread of the Information Technology, multimedia devices, along with the impressive growth of Web 2.0, have radically changed communication and ways of acquiring knowledge. Collaboration between individuals combined with an active, enriched sensorial experience of the user, have produced new paradigms for learning and teaching, compared to the classic passive methods of the past. Unfortunately, multimedia applications are usually designed for the sighted, and are ineffective for blind users, who typically interact with a computer by screen reader via vocal synthesizer and a keyboard. This book investigates the design of accessible and usable Web e-Learning tools and specifically collaborative environments to support learning for blind people, overcoming their difficulties during the interaction. While the book is oriented for developers designing Web applications to support blind users, it will also be useful for those (e.g. teachers, tutors, parents, students, etc.) who want to prepare educational contents more effective for learning.

See at: CNR ExploRA | www.edizioni-ai.com


2012 Contribution to book Open Access OPEN

Designing e-learning collaborative tools for blind people
Buzzi M. C., Buzzi M., Leporini B., Mori G.
The basic principle of e-learning is to achieve personal learning goals by acquiring skills and knowledge through computers or others network-enabled systems. The use of computers and the Internet have changed classic methods of teaching and learning, introducing the concept of distance learning as a great opportunity for studying unfettered by constraints of time and space. Although information and communication systems are helpful for implementing both the learning and teaching processes, e-learning is not merely a trivial way to transfer knowledge using electronic devices (computers, smart phone, mp3 players, etc.) while relying on the network and Web user interfaces. According to the recent concept of third-generation distance learning, the active participation of students in the formative process is an important factor in the personal learning phase (Beard & Wilson, 2002; Kolb, 1984). E-learning is a great opportunity to move from old traditional systems towards more effective and efficient methods for acquiring and transferring knowledge beyond the traditional class environments, adapting to the modern life and new technologies. In addition, acquisition of new skills and knowledge is not only affected by an individual's mental schemes or beliefs, but also by their interaction, cooperation and collaboration with others (Merrill, 1991). Communication and social collaboration are crucial for generating the best learning environment. In the learner-centred model, students assume the most important role while teachers investigate and experiment more interesting and interactive ways of teaching. Another important aspect is personalization of rhythms of studying, according to student abilities. Unfortunately, learning tools and collaborative tools in general are not always designed to be effectively used by blind users, who generally interact via an assistive technology, a screen reader, using a vocal synthesizer and only the keyboard. For instance, collaborative editing of documents could be very difficult or not usable at all for blind users if: 1) they are unaware of other users' changes; 2) the formatting toolbars and other interactive elements like menus are difficult or impossible to access; 3) the list of documents is not quickly available (Mori et al., 2011). In this chapter we will analyze e-learning collaborative and alternative tools in the learning environment, following the new paradigm for personalized acquisition of knowledge, in order to suggest basic guidelines for making effective and improving the interaction for blind people. We will present the possibilities and advantages of e-learning, focusing on its challenging opportunities for the blind. We will describe how blind people interact with interfaces using a screen reader with a voice synthesizer (as output modality) in combination with a keyboard (as input device). In addition, we will propose suggestions for improving the design of more effective tools to facilitate collaboration and blind users' interaction and personalization. Finally, we will supply two examples of the new paradigm of learning: 1) the design of more accessible interfaces of a Web editing collaborative tool, interacting with a screen reader and 2) a Web system to personalize learning by blind students using an mp3 player. Generally, active participation and collaborative interaction can improve the learning experience, so the full support of screen reader users in e-learning collaborative user interfaces (UIs) could also improve interaction and learning for blind people.Source: E-Learning - Long-Distance and Lifelong Perspectives, edited by Elvis Pontes, pp. 125–144. Rijeka: InTech Open Science/Open Minds, 2012
DOI: 10.5772/31377

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2011 Conference article Restricted

A Modified Google Docs UI accessible via screen reader
Mori G., Buzzi M. C., Buzzi M., Leporini B.
Collaborative editors are simple tools that enable people to create, share and exchange documents via Internet, quickly enhancing learning, knowledge and socialization. However, at present collaborative software is designed with little attention to the needs of differently-abled persons, such as the blind. Dynamic user interfaces and visual features delivering meaning may be inaccessible via screen reader, if an appropriate design is not adopted. In this demo we show a prototype of some modified Google Docs User Interfaces (UIs) -- for accessing and editing a document -- that allow full accessibility via JAWS screen reader. An interaction with the original and modified UIs is shown to highlight barriers and possible solutions for their elimination.Source: ECSCW 2011: The Twelfth European Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, pp. 1–4, Aarhus University, Denmark, 24-28 September 2011

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2011 Contribution to book Open Access OPEN

Collaborative Editing for All: the Google Docs Example
Mori G., Buzzi M. C., Buzzi M., Leporini B., Penichet V. M. R.
Collaborative software tools allow people to share documents and knowledge via Internet, in a simple, economic and efficient way. Unfortunately collaborative software often relies heavily on visual features and dynamic technologies with user interfaces that are difficult to use via screen reader, or are sometimes even inaccessible for the blind. In this paper we illustrate and discuss results of an accessibility inspection of the main collaborative functions of Google Docs using the JAWS screen reader. Results highlight several difficulties encountered when interacting with elements of the Google Docs interfaces. Content perception is often incomplete, since many elements or changes occurring in the collaborative environment are not intercepted by the screen reader and announced to the user. In addition, the behavior of the collaborative functions analyzed (as well as the rendering) changes from one web browser to another. Some general guidelines are discussed, for designing user interfaces of collaborative editors that are more usable when interacting via screen reader.Source: Universal Access in Human-Computer Interaction. Applications and Services, edited by Stephanidis, Constantine, pp. 165–174. Berlin: Springer, 2011
DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-21657-2_18

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2011 Contribution to book Open Access OPEN

Educational Impact of Structured Podcasts on Blind Users
Buzzi M. C., Buzzi M., Leporini B., Mori G.
Podcasts are increasingly present in education. However, sequential and continuous listening to didactic material might not be the most appropriate form for learning. For instance, if not well-organized, it can be frustrating to retrieve specific information from educational podcasts. We believe that structured podcasts (i.e., audio files that exploit the document structure) could facilitate navigation and search of content. In this paper we investigate the impact of structured podcasts on blind users, through a user test and satisfaction questionnaire administered to eighteen visually-impaired persons. Results confirm that structured podcasts are simple to use, rapid to explore and are greatly appreciated by blind users.Source: edited by Stephanidis, C, pp. 521–529. Berlin: Springer, 2011
DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-21657-2_56

See at: giove.isti.cnr.it Open Access | academic.microsoft.com Restricted | dblp.uni-trier.de Restricted | link.springer.com Restricted | link.springer.com Restricted | link.springer.com Restricted | CNR ExploRA Restricted | rd.springer.com Restricted | www.growkudos.com Restricted


2010 Software Unknown

ConcurTaskTrees environment (CTTE)
Mori G., Paternò F., Santoro C.
ConcurTaskTrees Environment (CTTE), an environment for editing and analysis of task models useful to support design of interactive applications starting with the human activities to support. The executable code is publicly available and it has received several thousand of downloads from organizations in various parts of the world, a list is available in the web site.

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2010 Journal article Open Access OPEN

Accessing Google Docs via Screen Reader
Buzzi M. C., Buzzi M., Leporini B., Mori G., Penichet V. M. R.
Groupware systems allow remote collaboration via computer in a simple, economic and efficient way. However, to be universally valuable, groupware systems must be accessible and usable for all, including the differently-abled. In this paper we discuss the results of testing the accessibility and usability of Google Docs (http://docs.google.com) when using a screen reader and a voice synthesizer, and suggest some basic guidelines for designing effective, efficient and satisfactory User Interfaces (UIs).Source: Lecture notes in computer science 6179 (2010): 92–99. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-14097-6_17
DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-14097-6_17

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2010 Conference article Open Access OPEN

Structured Audio Podcasts via Web Text-to-Speech System
Mori G., Buzzi M. C., Buzzi M., Leporini B.
Audio podcasting is increasingly present in the educational field and is especially appreciated as an ubiquitous/pervasive tool ("anywhere, anytime, at any pace") for acquiring or expanding knowledge. We designed and implemented a Web-based Text To Speech (TTS) system for automatic generation of a set of structured audio podcasts from a single text document. The system receives a document in input (doc, rtf, or txt), and in output provides a set of audio files that reflect the document's internal structure (one mp3 file for each document section), ready to be downloaded on portable mp3 players. Structured audio files are useful for everyone but are especially appreciated by blind users, who must explore content audially. Fully accessible for the blind, our system offers WAI-ARIA-based Web interfaces for easy navigation and interaction via screen reader and voice synthesizer, and produces a set of accessible audio files for Rockbox mp3 players (mp3 and talk files), allowing blind users to also listen to naturally spoken file names (instead of their spelled-out strings). In this demo, we will show how the system works when a user interacts via screen reader and voice synthesizer, showing the interaction with both our Web-based system and with an mp3 player.Source: WWW2010 - 19th International World Wide Web Conference, pp. 1281–1284, Raleigh, North Carolina, US, 26-30 April 2010
DOI: 10.1145/1772690.1772902

See at: giove.isti.cnr.it Open Access | academic.microsoft.com Restricted | core.ac.uk Restricted | dblp.uni-trier.de Restricted | dl.acm.org Restricted | dl.acm.org Restricted | doi.acm.org Restricted | giove.isti.cnr.it Restricted | CNR ExploRA Restricted | www.ra.ethz.ch Restricted | www.researchgate.net Restricted | wwwconference.org Restricted


2010 Conference article Unknown

Analysis and Improvement Proposal of Google Documents as a Groupware Tool
Buzzi M. C., Buzzi M., Mori G., Garrido J. E., R. Penichet V. M., Lozano M. D., Leporini B.
Collaborative applications are getting more and more common in any working environment. Google Docs is one of the most widely used groupware tools, which offer word processor, spreadsheet and presentation tools among other possibilities. Google Documents, as a component of Google Docs, focuses on word processing. In this paper, an analysis of this tool as a collaborative application is performed. The analysis consists of finding out how the tool handles groupware features such as collaboration, cooperation, communication, information sharing, awareness, time and space. Additionally, the analysis has been completed with an experiment which consists of organizing a task to be performed by a number of users in Google Documents. This evaluation suggested some ideas about how to enhance Google Documents to improve collaboration. Starting from the experiment outcomes and the users experience, some improvement have been proposed.Source: XI Congreso Internacional de Interaccion Persona-Ordenador, Valencia, 21 January 2010

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2010 Contribution to book Restricted

Making "Google Docs" User Interface More Accessible for Blind People
Mori G., Buzzi M. C., Buzzi M., Leporini B., Penichet V. M. R.
Groupware systems are increasingly embedded in our everyday life, both at the office and at home. Thus groupware systems should offer easy interaction for all, including the differently-abled. In this paper we describe the design and implementation of a modified version of Google Docs (http://docs.google.com) interfaces for collaborative editing of documents. Although consisting of only a few Web pages (login, document list, text editing) this modified version shows how it would be possible to enhance interaction via screen reader and voice synthesizer with this popular groupware system, while maintaining its appealing "look&feel".Source: , pp. 20–29. Berlin: Springer, 2010
DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-20810-2_4

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2009 Conference article Open Access OPEN

Automatically structuring text for audio learning
Leporini B., Buzzi M. C., Buzzi M., Mori G.
In recent years podcasting has been in great demand as a recreation and a learning tool. In this paper we describe the design and implementation of a system for automatically converting documents to structured audio. Our prototype is a Web-based service for preparing structured audio material to download on portable mp3 players. The on-line service is especially designed to aid users with special needs, such as the visually impaired. Ultimately, this would enhance comprehension for all.Source: 5th International Conference, UAHCI 2009, pp. 73–82, San Diego, CA - USA, July 19-24, 2009
DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-02713-0_8

See at: giove.isti.cnr.it Open Access | academic.microsoft.com Restricted | dblp.uni-trier.de Restricted | dl.acm.org Restricted | giove.isti.cnr.it Restricted | link.springer.com Restricted | link.springer.com Restricted | CNR ExploRA Restricted | rd.springer.com Restricted | www.growkudos.com Restricted | www.researchgate.net Restricted | www.springerlink.com Restricted


2008 Conference article Restricted

Exploiting Web services and model-based user iterfaces for multi-device access to home applications
Mori G., Paternò F., Spano L. D.
This paper presents a method, and the corresponding software architecture and prototype implementation to generate multi-device user interfaces in the home domain. The approach is based on Web services and model-based user interface generation. In particular, it focuses on multi-device interfaces obtained starting with XML descriptions of home Web services, which are then mapped onto user interface logical descriptions, from which it is possible to then generate user interfaces adapted to the target devices. During use, the generated interfaces are able to communicate with the home Web services and can be dynamically updated to reflect changes in domestic appliances available and the associated state.Source: DSV-IS 2008. International Workshop on Design, Specification and Verification of Interactive Systems, pp. 181–193, Kingston, Ontario, Canada, 16-18 July 2008
DOI: 10.1007/978-3-540-70569-7

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2008 Journal article Open Access OPEN

Authoring pervasive multimodal user interfaces
Paternò F., Santoro C., Mäntyjärvi J., Mori G., Sansone S.
In this paper, we present an environment for authoring pervasive multimodal user interfaces. It is composed of a set of XML-based languages, transformations among such languages, and an authoring tool. It provides designers with the possibility of designing interfaces for a wide set of platforms, which support various modalities. We describe how the environment has deeply changed from the initial mono-modal, web-oriented environment and provide example applications for a number of platforms.Source: International journal of Web engineering and technology (Online) 4 (2008): 235–261. doi:10.1504/IJWET.2008.018099
DOI: 10.1504/ijwet.2008.018099

See at: International Journal of Web Engineering and Technology Open Access | International Journal of Web Engineering and Technology Restricted | VTT Research Information System Restricted | International Journal of Web Engineering and Technology Restricted | International Journal of Web Engineering and Technology Restricted | International Journal of Web Engineering and Technology Restricted | International Journal of Web Engineering and Technology Restricted | International Journal of Web Engineering and Technology Restricted | CNR ExploRA Restricted | International Journal of Web Engineering and Technology Restricted | International Journal of Web Engineering and Technology Restricted | International Journal of Web Engineering and Technology Restricted


2007 Conference article Restricted

Authoring multi-device Web applications with database access
Mori G., Paternò F., Santoro C.
In this paper we present an environment for authoring Web sites through a model-based approach for user interface design. In particular, we focus on how it supports the access to remote databases and the dynamic generation of the Web pages presenting the corresponding query results. The environment is able to support development of applications implemented in many Web mark-up languages (XHTML, XHTML MP, X+V, VoiceXML) adapted to various interaction platforms (vocal, mobile, desktop,...).Source: Web Engineering . 7th International Conference, ICWE 2007, pp. 182–187, Como, Italy, 16-20 Luglio 2007

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